Day 9 of Bojon Appreciation Month.

Greetings from somewhere west of Bojon Town.  That place pulls at me like a magnet.  If you blindfolded me and spun me around and told me to point to Bojon Town, I’d nail it.  It’s home.

We were blessed to go to St. Mary’s School.  We went to school with the same group of kids for 8 or 9 years, and made friendships that lasted for our entire lives.  We stuck together, and I still get happy and excited to see any one of them.

I’m still scared of nuns.  I don’t know why.  Most of them are tiny and sweet looking.  There are two nuns at St. Mary’s that I see in church on Sundays.  I was walking into a store the other day, and one was coming out and we almost bumped into each other.  My first thought was to run.  I don’t know why.  Nuns were scary.  All but two.  Sister Caroline was my all time favorite, but she was a Bojon and that makes perfect sense.  And Sister Pauline was a hottie!  Robes and hoods couldn’t hide that, not even from me when I was in the 4th grade.  I think I better stop while I’m still short of blasphemy.

Anyone remember the big metal slide next to the 3rd grade window on the east side of St. Mary’s School?  It was really tall, and one winter, we poured water and let it freeze and made a long ice runway under the slide.  We’d go down the slide and try to land on our feet and see how far we could slide.  Most of the time, we slid on our heads or butts, and after a few days, the nuns shut us down due to injuries.  Why would kids do that?  Well, the world’s tallest ski jump is in Slovenia.  Most of the kids were Bojons.  We were just doing what came naturally.

There’s a Facebook group where people talk about their memories from Pueblo.  The Pool Hall came up one day, and some clownshoes wearing asshat said that the pool hall was ‘a hangout for kids from South High’.  I had to politely straighten him out and tell him that the pool hall was ‘a hangout for Bojons who sometimes tolerated assclowns from South High’.  The guy may need more straightening out in the future, as he still seems to be a bit confused about Bojons and how they behave.

Here’s a memory of Bojon Town that a lot of people probably forgot, or never knew.  At one time, there was a miniature golf course in Bojon Town.  Anyone remember?  If not, as Paul Harvey used to say, you’ll have to wait until tomorrow for the rest of the story.

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6 responses to this post.

  1. Now I do not remember miniature golf in Bojon Town but it would have been fun. What I have disliked about the stories I hear from the Eiler Heights clique is the fact that they interviewed a couple people who live on the same block. I don’t have much love for the local Pueblo newspaper. They don’t even deserve to have their name mentioned. Another clique! I tried to access the complete story about your sister Janet and they blocked me saying I had to pay! Wow! I was dumbfounded! As for the nuns, I loved Sister Benita. She was the principle when we were in the lower grades. She would roll up her long skirt and play baseball with us. I loved that nun! Sister Caroline tried to force me to use my right hand and made me vomit inside my religion book so she was not a favorite for me. She was related to Father Daniel Gnidica and he such a great priest. I also loved Sister Adelaide, 6th grade teacher. When my grandmother who was my BFF passed away Sister took me aside and expressed her sympathy. I remember asking my mom why she was so nice, other than being a nun, and how would she know my pain and sorrow? My mom told me Sister Adelaide had lost her brother. He was a fireman and he fell off the back of the fire truck as they raced to a fire. Back than I guess they did not have head gear and he died from massive head injuries. When Sister passed away at age 100 I remember my mom telling me and I wept! She was an angel masquerading as a Catholic school nun. I just know it! As for the devilish nuns, when we were in high school, Joe Brown, one of the guys who came from the orphanage told us someone told him Sister Beatrice (4th grade) died and someone said they saw the devil pull her down to hell! LOL! She was wicked and mean and very mean spirited. I always think about my mom. When dad passed away, Father Gregory Hudson was our pastor and he gave the eulogy and since he did not know my dad real well, he talked with mom before the service and he said when he was a kid he would get down on his knees each night and thank God he was born a poor Irishman! He said he felt bad for all the sLOVEnian kids because when they spoke in their native language the nuns would slap them down! I always feel sad, to this very day, that my mother and her siblings and others suffered such pain. Today people would riot in the streets as we clearly can see that happens already in the US. sLOVEnian people suffered so many heartaches and hardships and yet they prevailed and I am proud to have come from that! I have my Grandmother and my Tata Rose on my Strong willed Women Page at pinterest along with mom and others. I al always finding little ways to honor them for making me so strong willed and I am just happy that I was born into what I was and I would not change it for all the worldly wealth.
    Sorry I am writing a book here. I just start thinking and my words pour onto the page.
    Love ya cousin!
    xoAnne

    Reply

    • I love reading your responses. I remember something, you fill in a lot of blanks for me, and I remember even more stuff! I remember seeing Sister Benita play ball with the girls. That was a sight! Sister Adelaide hit me on the head with a 3 pound coffee can, so she’s not at the top of my list. As my mom said at the time, “He probably had it coming, but that’s why he has an ass. Hit him there from now on”. Man, I can’t believe how many things we forget, so I better start writing faster before I forget it all!

      Reply

  2. Posted by Mike Deverich on June 10, 2015 at 5:22 am

    Yes how could anyone forget the slide and the ice. You had to have good leather soles really slide far. Do you remember Red Rover , I think we let someone thru the line and they went thru the rails and into the stairwell to the basement. My knuckles still hurt, it was amazing how quiet they were when they snuck up behind you, could have had Ninja training. Sister Rosario still haunts me, I think she could have killed any of us with her pinkie. A reply to a previous post, your Grandma my Auntie Gella was the best story teller in the history of the world, you could not listen to her without ending up with tears in your eyes from laughter. Keep writing about the greatest place to grow up, with all the semi crazies, all the love, the knowledge, morals, wisdom and all the family within that small part of earth.

    Reply

    • Mike, I think that Sister Rosaria truly hated me and you. I don’t say that lightly, but when I think back on how she treated us, it seemed like she tried to break our spirit. The other nuns, I think they had good intentions, but that last one was a different kind of nun. Do you remember her attempt at teaching us sex education? She asked us to each write down a question, and she ended up throwing them away after she read them? I still remember the look on her face. If she could have gotten away with it, we would have all been buried down the tracks somewhere.

      Reply

  3. Posted by Mike Deverich on June 11, 2015 at 5:50 am

    Yes she did and the worst was when the dreaded note was sent home. First you were beaten at school then had to take the note home which resulted in another beating. They ( nuns and parents ) would be thrown in jail today for child abuse if that happened today. No 4th amendment rights, because if you “forgot” the note it was twice as bad. I do not believe Skinner was correct, physical punishment worked very well to correct behavior.

    Reply

    • Skinner never went to Catholic School. Look at our class. We all turned out pretty much the same. We avoided situations out of fear. In high school, we were ahead of the kids that went to public school because of it, though. We were smart, driven, and scared shitless!

      Reply

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